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BRIEF COMMUNICATION
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 36  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 254-257

Anxiety as a predictor of gaming disorder among young adults


1 Department of Clinical Psychology, SHUT Clinic (Service for Healthy Use of Technology), National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
2 Department of Clinical Psychology, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
3 Department of Biostatistics, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Psychiatric Social Work, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
5 Department of Clinical Psychology, SHUT Clinic, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
6 Centre for Addiction Medicine, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Manoj Kumar Sharma
Department of Clinical Psychology, SHUT Clinic (Service for Healthy Use of Technology), National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bengaluru, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijsp.ijsp_129_19

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Background: Psychological morbidities have been found to be associated with gaming disorder. Objective: The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship of gaming disorder with affective states of depression, stress, and anxiety. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 403 males in the age range of 18–25 years. The mean age was 21 years. These young adults were approached for the administration of study tools from colleges and community of urban areas of Bengaluru. Inverse binomial sampling was used to collect the sample. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale Short-Form and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 were administered. Results: Stepwise regression analysis indicated that anxiety significantly contributed to gaming disorder. Depression and stress did not contribute significantly toward gaming disorder. Conclusions: This study implies the need for intervention of anxiety in the context of gaming disorder and the design of appropriate interventions.


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